tyresoff:

image

Tyresö FF players’ salaries revealed

Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet has today published several of the Tyresö FF players’ salaries, revealing that Marta and Verónica Boquete both earn more than twice as much as Caroline Seger, who is the captain of the team. Tyresö FF chairman Hans Lindberg claims that the salaries were within the club’s budget, and says they would not have signed the players otherwise. When asked about the club signing as many as four new Brazilian players in January, Lindberg defends the signings by saying that by replacing some players ahead of this season, the club has lowered their total budget for salaries. Noteable is also the fact that the highest paid player in the NWSL earns $30 000 a year, while Christen Press as one of the lowest paid players at Tyresö makes twice that amount with a monthly salary above $5000. 

Click below to read the complete list of the salaries.

Read More

funnyordie:

Frozen Told Through Facebook
Because everyone knows Facebook is the best place for telling fairy tales.

funnyordie:

Frozen Told Through Facebook

Because everyone knows Facebook is the best place for telling fairy tales.

medicalstate:

The ‘free market’ approach to healthcare means seeing more patients in less time. We’ve lost the human connection in health reform.

This is a call to begin a spirited discussion centering on such real healthcare reform. I am not naive to the hard economic realities of healthcare delivery or how civil discussions on reforming healthcare payments need to continue. However, meaningful and lasting solutions will not be found in models that commoditize health and continue to be based on a foundation of reward and punishment alone. They will be found in models that bring back the joy of healthcare to professionals who deliver it – physicians such as me and countless others who seem to have lost the single most powerful driving force – purpose.

(Source: compoundfractur)

everythinginthesky:


My brother disappeared over the weekend. I’d gone down to see him and my mom. We were watching a movie at around 10:30pm, when he stood up and went to the kitchen. He then presumably walked out. I went to see where he was after about 20 minutes. When I couldn’t find him, I assumed/hoped he’d gone out for a cigarette and a walk.
We went out to search for him and hour or so later, and phoned the police about 3 hours after that. We’ve done everything we can since then, including posting flyers and searching everywhere. It’s been 36 hours now. The temperature has been around 0° C both evenings and it’s been raining as of last night.
If you know anyone in south England - especially in Hants/Hampshire - I’d really appreciate if you could point them toward this post, ask them to take a quick glance at the picture and keep it in mind when travelling over the next few days. We believe he’s been off his anti-psychotics medication for around 5 days. He’s not violent at all, nor a hazard to anyone but himself. He will probably be confused, with some periods of lucidity. If found, please immediately contact the Hampshire police on the non-emergency number 101, referencing case #200 from 16th February 2014.
Thank you.

everythinginthesky:

My brother disappeared over the weekend. I’d gone down to see him and my mom. We were watching a movie at around 10:30pm, when he stood up and went to the kitchen. He then presumably walked out.
I went to see where he was after about 20 minutes. When I couldn’t find him, I assumed/hoped he’d gone out for a cigarette and a walk.

We went out to search for him and hour or so later, and phoned the police about 3 hours after that. We’ve done everything we can since then, including posting flyers and searching everywhere. It’s been 36 hours now. The temperature has been around 0° C both evenings and it’s been raining as of last night.

If you know anyone in south England - especially in Hants/Hampshire - I’d really appreciate if you could point them toward this post, ask them to take a quick glance at the picture and keep it in mind when travelling over the next few days. We believe he’s been off his anti-psychotics medication for around 5 days. He’s not violent at all, nor a hazard to anyone but himself. He will probably be confused, with some periods of lucidity. If found, please immediately contact the Hampshire police on the non-emergency number 101, referencing case #200 from 16th February 2014.

Thank you.

hellogiggles:

misssuzyvalentine:

edgysatsuma:

fozmeadows:

whataboutthemenses:

blackamazon:

facebooksexism:

breewriteswords:

pleatedjeans:

The mayor of Mississauga, Canada is a badass. via

Hazel McCallion, everbody.

92 years old,

34 years in office,

$0 in debt

$700 million in reserve

Eight prime ministers

One truck.

But women aren’t strong leaders… OH WAIT.

Now I’m sure somebody’s gonna tell me something but

  • supports a Palestinian state
  • supports Aids CHarities
  • told her city well if we cant get money y’all need to pay taxes and maintains a 76 approval rating
  • nick named Hurricane Hazel
  • and is so boss lady that she don’t run she’ tells  folks to give that money to charity

I will always reblog this lady.

This woman is officially my new hero.

In regards to the flooding in the GTA yesterday, she apparently said that she hasn’t seen rain like that since her neighbour Noah was building a boat.

New hero in life. 

Whoa, AMAZING!

Gonna sport a pinky ring like this badass

beornsbees:

the norwegian curling team’s pants appreciation post (◡‿◡✿)

(Source: siriusno)

tyresoff:

As soccer pals and teammates, they’ve had similar goalsArticle by Kevin Baxter for the LA Times
Christen Press and Whitney Engen grew up just 13 months and a few miles apart on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. And they’ve been virtually inseparable on a soccer field ever since, playing together as kids, against each other in college and now as teammates with the U.S. national team.
Both, however, saw their careers get off to inauspicious starts.
As a preschooler, Press was forced to play with older kids in a coed league because one team was short a girl.
"I didn’t touch the ball once," she remembers. "I picked daisies and waved to my mom."
Engen played because she got candy when she showed up at practice. And her parents encouraged her because, despite the sugar high, the sport was the only one that wore her out.
"They just kept signing me up," Engen says now. "It meant Whitney was sleeping at night."
Twenty years later the daisies and the candy are long gone. Press and Engen play now for paychecks, pride and, they hope, a shot at winning a World Cup title next year with the U.S. national team.
Three games into a new season Press, a 25-year-old forward, leads the top-ranked U.S. team with three goals and an assist despite having played just 86 minutes. And Engen, 26, has been on the field more than all but two other defenders, helping the U.S. to a 1-0 win over Canada and two shutout victories over Russia.
On any other team, both would be leaders. But with the star-studded U.S. squad entering the heavy part of its schedule in next month’s Algarve Cup — where it will meet Japan and Sweden in group play — both could soon find themselves watching from the sidelines instead.
"How do you fit them all in?" U.S. Coach Tom Sermanni says, more in wonder than complaint. "Every area is strong, every area is competitive. Without a doubt we’ve got the strongest squad of any national team in the world."
That can be both a boon and a bane for young players such as Press and Engen, who find themselves sacrificing playing time for a chance to learn from talented teammates.
Press, for example, is fighting Abby Wambach, Sydney Leroux and, when she’s healthy, Alex Morgan — the three top strikers in the world — for one of two spots at forward. And Engen is trying to break into a back line that includes team captain Christie Rampone, veteran Rachel Van Hollebeke (nee Buehler) and Stephanie Cox. Together that trio has combined for 484 international caps, seven Olympic medals and seven World Cup teams.
"It’s an honor to be on the field with some of these players," Press says. "But at the same time it’s kind of nice to feel like we’re the competition and we’re coming.
"Yeah, every day we come to the field and we’re fighting for a spot. But we’re also fighting for an opportunity to do something great."
Both Press and Engen have traveled remarkably similar journeys to get this far, starting in the same place and then intersecting often on the way to the national team.
"It’s been like a curving path that keeps coming together," Press says.
If not for Press’ father Cody, a former football player at Dartmouth, it may have been a journey Engen missed. As a grade-schooler, she was having a miserable time playing on another team in a Palos Verdes league when Cody Press asked her to join the one he was coaching.
"It was like the best experience ever!" Engen remembers. "Otherwise I could have probably quit soccer."
Their paths continued to cross as competitors in college and as teammates in Europe, where Press, playing alongside Engen for Stockholm’s Tyreso FF, became the first American to lead Sweden’s top league in scoring.
Now that they’ve reached the top level of their sport, it’s clear neither needs soccer as much as soccer needs players like them: well-spoken women with brains, skill and personality.
Although Press won college soccer’s most prestigious award, the MAC Hermann Trophy, during a record-setting career at Stanford, she was also an academic All-American with a double major who speaks three languages and is already an accomplished writer.
"Of course I have other passions and other interests, but soccer’s always my priority," she says. "I actually think that there’s such an opportunity to touch the world and affect the world through soccer that’s hard for me to even see another path right now."
Engen, meanwhile, made the dean’s list at North Carolina five times and has already passed the qualifying exam for law school. At one time that had been her preferred career path, but now a law degree is the fall-back plan. How many people can say that?
"Before I kind of had a set plan that if by this certain date I hadn’t broken into this team that maybe I would go back to school," she says. "I guess I’ve taken the approach that there is always time to go back to school but there’s not going to always be time to live in England. Or to be able to play in Sweden.
"These kinds of things, they don’t just pop up in your life."

tyresoff:

As soccer pals and teammates, they’ve had similar goals
Article by Kevin Baxter for the LA Times

Christen Press and Whitney Engen grew up just 13 months and a few miles apart on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. And they’ve been virtually inseparable on a soccer field ever since, playing together as kids, against each other in college and now as teammates with the U.S. national team.

Both, however, saw their careers get off to inauspicious starts.

As a preschooler, Press was forced to play with older kids in a coed league because one team was short a girl.

"I didn’t touch the ball once," she remembers. "I picked daisies and waved to my mom."

Engen played because she got candy when she showed up at practice. And her parents encouraged her because, despite the sugar high, the sport was the only one that wore her out.

"They just kept signing me up," Engen says now. "It meant Whitney was sleeping at night."

Twenty years later the daisies and the candy are long gone. Press and Engen play now for paychecks, pride and, they hope, a shot at winning a World Cup title next year with the U.S. national team.

Three games into a new season Press, a 25-year-old forward, leads the top-ranked U.S. team with three goals and an assist despite having played just 86 minutes. And Engen, 26, has been on the field more than all but two other defenders, helping the U.S. to a 1-0 win over Canada and two shutout victories over Russia.

On any other team, both would be leaders. But with the star-studded U.S. squad entering the heavy part of its schedule in next month’s Algarve Cup — where it will meet Japan and Sweden in group play — both could soon find themselves watching from the sidelines instead.

"How do you fit them all in?" U.S. Coach Tom Sermanni says, more in wonder than complaint. "Every area is strong, every area is competitive. Without a doubt we’ve got the strongest squad of any national team in the world."

That can be both a boon and a bane for young players such as Press and Engen, who find themselves sacrificing playing time for a chance to learn from talented teammates.

Press, for example, is fighting Abby Wambach, Sydney Leroux and, when she’s healthy, Alex Morgan — the three top strikers in the world — for one of two spots at forward. And Engen is trying to break into a back line that includes team captain Christie Rampone, veteran Rachel Van Hollebeke (nee Buehler) and Stephanie Cox. Together that trio has combined for 484 international caps, seven Olympic medals and seven World Cup teams.

"It’s an honor to be on the field with some of these players," Press says. "But at the same time it’s kind of nice to feel like we’re the competition and we’re coming.

"Yeah, every day we come to the field and we’re fighting for a spot. But we’re also fighting for an opportunity to do something great."

Both Press and Engen have traveled remarkably similar journeys to get this far, starting in the same place and then intersecting often on the way to the national team.

"It’s been like a curving path that keeps coming together," Press says.

If not for Press’ father Cody, a former football player at Dartmouth, it may have been a journey Engen missed. As a grade-schooler, she was having a miserable time playing on another team in a Palos Verdes league when Cody Press asked her to join the one he was coaching.

"It was like the best experience ever!" Engen remembers. "Otherwise I could have probably quit soccer."

Their paths continued to cross as competitors in college and as teammates in Europe, where Press, playing alongside Engen for Stockholm’s Tyreso FF, became the first American to lead Sweden’s top league in scoring.

Now that they’ve reached the top level of their sport, it’s clear neither needs soccer as much as soccer needs players like them: well-spoken women with brains, skill and personality.

Although Press won college soccer’s most prestigious award, the MAC Hermann Trophy, during a record-setting career at Stanford, she was also an academic All-American with a double major who speaks three languages and is already an accomplished writer.

"Of course I have other passions and other interests, but soccer’s always my priority," she says. "I actually think that there’s such an opportunity to touch the world and affect the world through soccer that’s hard for me to even see another path right now."

Engen, meanwhile, made the dean’s list at North Carolina five times and has already passed the qualifying exam for law school. At one time that had been her preferred career path, but now a law degree is the fall-back plan. How many people can say that?

"Before I kind of had a set plan that if by this certain date I hadn’t broken into this team that maybe I would go back to school," she says. "I guess I’ve taken the approach that there is always time to go back to school but there’s not going to always be time to live in England. Or to be able to play in Sweden.

"These kinds of things, they don’t just pop up in your life."

footybedsheets:

Dayyyyyam. I mean masha’Allah. ;)

downfalling:

these kids these days don’t known our struggle

downfalling:

these kids these days don’t known our struggle

World No. 1, 2, 3 and 5. Basically, let the sparks fly! #Sochi2014

World No. 1, 2, 3 and 5. Basically, let the sparks fly! #Sochi2014